Tag Archives: Marvin Bell

Cerro El Roble | The Oak Hill

Top View

It’s becoming Fall here! So strange to be writing about Fall foods like casseroles and chilly weather when so many of you are breaking out your skirts and t-shirts.

I went on another hike last weekend–this one on Cerro El Roble–The Oak Hill–and located in La Campana National Park about an hour and a half outside of Santiago on route five near Til Til. The forest was full of bright orange and deep red leaves.

This is the view from the top.

Continue reading

Advertisements

7 Comments

Filed under Chile

Golden

Leaves litter the sidewalks now–golden and curled. The scuttle of dried leaves even scared the tender greyhound I walked today. As I dashed through them, chasing after the lithe hound on my leash, the leaves brought to mind part of one of my favorite poems by Marvin Bell, “These Green Going to Yellow”–

This year,
I’m raising the emotional ante,
putting my face
in the leaves to be stepped on,
seeing myself among them, that is;
that is, likening
leaf-vein to artery, leaf to flesh,
the passage of a leaf in autumn
to the passage of autumn,
branch-tip and winter spaces
to possibilities, and possibility

Apartment porters repeat a ritual each day–washing the sidewalks in the morning and sweeping the leaves all afternoon. The smoke seems to have dissipated and the air is becoming fresh, fresco, one of my favorite words. The city is beginning to absorb me more each day. To me, there is no season as welcoming as fall.

3 Comments

Filed under New to Town

Valzhyna Mort

The Poet Valzhyna Mort

Please indulge me in some non-Buenos Aires related news. One of my friends, an enormously talented and humble poet named Valzhyna, has a new book entitled Factory of Tears. Her second book of poetry was published by my all-time favorite press, the well respected Copper Canyon.

The press has published some of my writing “mentors” and deep imagist poets such as W.S. Merwin, Marvin Bell, and Pablo Neruda.

Valzhyna is from Belarus and writes in Belarusian. Her work is emphatic–her words are sparse, clipped, and click to the tongue. I firmly believe she is one of our generation’s best young writers and can’t wait to see what’s in store for her. The writer Franz Wright is translating her work.
Continue reading

4 Comments

Filed under Arts, Literature